List of some of the temples according the year of construction:


Preah Ko | Bakong | Lolei | Phnom Krom | Prasat Kravan | East Mebon | Pre Rup | Banteay Srei | Phimeanakas and the Royal Palace | Ta Keo | Baphuon | Angkor Wat | Banteay Samre | Srah Srang | Preah Khan | The Elephants Terrace | Neak Pean | Ta Som | Ta Prohm | Banteay Kdei | Bayon | Leper King Terrace


Preah Khan

This is a Buddhist temple located about 2.8 kilometers (1.7 miles) to the northeast of Terrace of the Elephants. It was built by King Jayavarman VII in the late 1100's. Today, Preah Khan, which means “Sacred Sword”, is one of the interesting Angkorian temples to visit. Preah Khan has many door-frames, all made of stones, in line with the east-west and north-south directions.

The closest other interesting temple to visit is Neak Pean, which is located a few hundred meters (yards) to the east of Preah Khan.

Nearby toilets are located on the road near the north entrance of the temple, while restaurants are located on the west entrance of the temple.

Click the pictures for more and bigger photos of the temple and click here for more details about Preah Khan (by the Angkor Guide.com).

Terrace of the Elephants

This Mahayana Buddhism associated site was built by King Jayavarman VII in the late 12th century, the same King who built Bayon. The Terrace of the Elephants is situated at the heart of the Angkor Thom city, about 3.7 kilometers (2.3 miles) to the north of the Angkor Wat entrance, and measures 350 meters long (south-north), and 3 meters high (the platform).

King Jayavarman VII used this site to view his military parade and exercise, as well as for celebrations. This was also the place where high ranked officers met King Jayavarman VII seeking for advice before going to war. The platform was designed to be as high as 3 meters, so that the King’s officers could talk to their King while riding their elephants. King Jayavarman VII himself is known as the King of War.

The King also used to watch the “elephant fighting”, where his men sitting on top of their elephants played fighting games.

You can imagine when you are standing on the platform, facing to the east (facing the Suor Prat towers - see photo on right), hundreds of soldiers, their officers and commanders on their elephants, being inspected by King Jayavarman VII before going to war.

It is also believed that King Jayavarman VII also used to watch acrobatic performances in this area, where men walked along ropes from one tower to another (the Suor Prat towers).

On the northern part of the Terrace there is a big statue of lotus flowers and next to it, there is a carving of an elephant with 3 heads. This 3-headed-elephant carvings (one elephant with 3 heads) represents thunder, lightning and rain, three kinds of natural disasters in Angkor.

Click the pictures for more and bigger photos of the temple and click here for more details about The Elephants Terrace (by the Angkor Guide.com).

Neak Pean

Neak Pean or also called Neak Poan ("the Entwined Naga”) was built by King Jayavarman VII in the late 12th century. It is located about 3.2 kilometers/1.9 miles east of Preah Khan or 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) west of Ta Som.

Neak Pean, which was dedicated to the Buddha, consists of a few pools. In the center pool, there is an artificial round temple-island that has a diameter of 14 meters (46 feet). During dry season visitors might be able to get closer to this temple and during wet season, the water fills the pool and this temple becomes a temple-island again.

Owning to its position, usually tourists visit either Preah Khan or Ta Som first with a stop at Neak Pean in between. Also because of its location, often visitors have their lunch at restaurants available in the north side of the temple, where the toilets are also located.

Click the pictures for more and bigger photos of the temple and click here for more details about Neak Pean (by the Angkor Guide.com).

Ta Som

As mentioned above (see Neak Pean), Ta Som or “the Ancestor Som” lies just about 2.5 kilometers/1.5 miles away from Neak Pean. It was also built by King Jayavarman VII in the late 12th century and it was dedicated to the Buddha.

There are huge Ficus trees growing on top of some parts of the temple, though not as spectacular as Ta Prohm.

There are souvenir sellers around the entrance, as well as toilets and an electric bike station on the north side of the road in front of Ta Som.

Click the pictures for more and bigger photos of the temple and click here for more details about Ta Som (by the Angkor Guide.com).





Don't forget to LIKE US too!



previous page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 next page


Your Comments:


Name:

date

Comment:

0 comment

You are solely responsible for your comments. You must read and agree to abide by all of the terms and conditions between you and www.JoTravelGuide.com, as available on the following links: (Terms of Use: "Your Comments"), general Terms and Conditions (click here) and Privacy Policy (click here).



Back to top


we accept donation to help us keeping this website active, please click "Donate" below if you would like to participate. thank you.